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MRI Brain - Facial Palsy and Gluten Sensitivity - A Connection is Found

A recent paper published in the Journal of  Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry discusses a strong connection in patients with facial palsy induced by gluten.

Recurrent peripheral facial paralysis (PFP) is an uncommon disorder that often occurs in the setting of family history. In 2001, we observed a patient with recurrent PFP who manifested symptoms of coeliac disease (CD) several months later. Because of this observation and because neurological disorders may be the only manifestation of atypical forms of CD…

Study Source:

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry doi:10.1136/jnnp-2011-301921

 What is Facial Palsy?

Facial palsy is a disorder characterized by paralysis of muscles in the face.  It is sometimes referred to as Bell’s Palsy.  It can be caused by a Herpes virus, and in sometimes caused as a result of inner ear infections.  New research links gluten intolerance to this neurological disorder.

Gluten Sensitivity & Nerve Damage

There are numerous studies linking gluten intolerance issues with damage to the nervous system.  Some doctors believe that the primary way that this protein induces damage is through nerves.

  • Dr. Charles Parker, a psychiatrist has great experience with gluten damaging brain tissue.
  • Dr. John Symes, a veterinarian has discovered a connection between gluten intolerance and epilepsy in dogs and cats.
  • Dr. Hadjivassilliou has discovered a link between gluten and multiple neurological diseases including cerebellar ataxia, nerve pain, numbness and tingling, dizziness, and more

Gluten can also contribute to neurological problems by inducing nutritional deficiencies…

Resolution of Nerve Disease on a Gluten Free Diet

Many patients experience a complete resolution of nervous system symptoms after going on a gluten free diet.  I have personally seen the following conditions improve or resolve in my Houston clinic:

  • Migraine headache
  • Nerve entrapment syndromes (carpal tunnel disease, cervicobrachial syndrome)
  • Chronic nerve pain (reflex sympathetic dystrophy)
  • Neuropathy (numbness and tingling of the hands, feet, on the torso, etc)
  • Bipolar disease
  • Schizophrenia
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Autism
  • Vertigo
  • Epilepsy

Gluten is a Neurotoxin

Although gluten is not a catch all for people with nerve disease, it is a known neurological toxin and intolerance/sensitivity should be ruled out in those suffering with unexplained neurological diseases.  If you are already following a gluten free diet, but continue to have neurological symptoms, consider that other common environmental factors can contribute to neurological symptoms and nerve damage as well:

  • aspartame (Nutrasweet)
  • Caffeine
  • Chemical pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides commonly sprayed on non organic produce
  • Mercury exposure (present in some vaccines)
  • Lead exposure
  • Cadmium exposure
  • Aluminum exposure (excessive)
  • B-vitamin deficiency states (especially vitamins B1, B12, B6, B3, and folate)

Need help going gluten free?  Check out the Glutenology Health Matrix Here <<==

Gluten Free Warrior Commentary

comments

6 responses on “Facial Palsy and Gluten Sensitivity – A Connection is Found

  1. Donna Dean says:

    Have had chronic Restless Leg Syndrome for many years. Dr’s just don’t know what to do for it. Work 11 hours a day and it is extremely difficult to get even 3-4 hours rest. Many nights I kick my legs all night or get up and walk, rub my legs or take another OTC sleeping pill. Sleeping pills don’t work most of the time. RLS also affects me in the day time whenever I have to sit for a period of time. I try to be gluten-free. Any ideas? Thank you

    • Vivian says:

      Restless Leg Syndrome
      Magnesium
      Best is pico liquid magnesium added to all your filtered drinking water with a little sea salt and organic apple cidar vinegar (with mother) added. Drink continuously during waking hours. 1/2 your body weight in ounces per day.
      See Carolyn Dean, M.D. website
      I use her products and also:
      Trace Minerals Research Mega-Mag 400 mg per serving when need to be conservative with dollars.
      Additionally, you can use Magnesium Oil. Rub on legs, feet and anywhere else on body with tenseness/tightness/soreness. Can also the oil or luquid magnedium to body lotion & apply it that way. Be sure lotions you are using contain no toxic ingredients.
      In addition take Epsom Salts/Baking Soda baths – multiple weekly.
      May take a while for your body to get all the magnesium it requires.
      Give these procedures/products at least 90 days before you decide they are not working.

    • Diana Sterling Boydstun says:

      Depleted iron and magnesium are a frequent problem for celiacs. Once I began supplements, ( and quinine, as in tonic water, helps too, but not without the vitamins) the RLS completely disappeared. Good luck to you!

  2. Vicki says:

    I have peripheral neuropathy in my right leg, tingling & numbness in my hands & feet, but the most severe symptom is the ataxia, which is so severe that I am now in a wheelchair or motorized scooter. I have gone gluten-free, as much as possible, since I have also been diagnosed with Lyme, Bartonella & Babesia. When I do slip up & eat something with gluten in it, i don’t notice any symptoms.

    Could I still have a gluten intolerance?

  3. Elaine Logan says:

    To Donna Dean. Get an indoor hot tub/spa. I don’t feel relief until I get out of the spa and lay back in bed. No restless legs. It has been a lifesaver after years of RLS. That is, if this site will let me leave this comment.

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