Category Archives: Nerve damage

Gluten & Bone Loss – The Topic is Much Deeper Than Calcium

Bone Loss is a Complex Process It is a common thought that osteoporosis associated with celiac disease is a result of malabsorption of vitamins and minerals (mainly vitamin D and calcium). The above report links an autoimmune process of bone loss to gluten sensitivity separate and distinct from gluten induced malabsorption. This finding begs us […]

Gluten & Your Nervous System – Depression, Brain Abnormalities, and Neuropathy

For years scientists have been investigating the detrimental effects of gluten on brain and nerve tissue.  A recent study published in the Journal of  Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry is just one more piece of evidence pointing to this overwhelming connection… Patients with established coeliac disease referred for neurological opinion show significant brain abnormality on MR […]

Is Gluten Sensitivity Linked to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)?

A recent research report identified an individual with progressive nerve damage findings mimicking the autoimmune neurological condition known as Lou Gehrig’s disease (AKA – ALS or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis).  The condition manifests as progressive muscle weakness and loss, involuntary spasms and twitches, and eventually a degeneration of the muscles responsible for aiding in breathing.  Many […]

Gluten Sensitivity and Restless Leg Syndrome – Is there a connection?

Bad Bacteria = Restless Legs Restless leg syndrome is a serious medical condition.  It is thought to be an autoimmune disease affecting the nerves in the legs.  This condition is characterized by feeling of restlessness in the legs.  It can also manifest as numbness and tingling, and shooting nerve pains in the legs making it […]

Facial Palsy and Gluten Sensitivity – A Connection is Found

MRI Brain 1024x620 - Facial Palsy and Gluten Sensitivity - A Connection is Found

A recent paper published in the Journal of  Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry discusses a strong connection in patients with facial palsy induced by gluten. Recurrent peripheral facial paralysis (PFP) is an uncommon disorder that often occurs in the setting of family history. In 2001, we observed a patient with recurrent PFP who manifested symptoms of […]

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