lab tests for celiac disease are flawed and limitedResearchers have identified additional gluten proteins responsible for generating immune damage in patients with celiac disease.  These studies help shed more light on the mechanisms behind gluten sensitivity.  Additionally, this new information helps dispel the myth that only alpha gliadin (a specific type of gluten subfraction) is responsible for the immune reaction that contributes to celiac sprue.

Unexpectedly, a sequence from omega-gliadin (wheat) and C-hordein (barley) but not alpha-gliadin was immunodominant regardless of the grain consumed.

Sources:

Sci Transl Med. 2010 Jul 21;2(41):41ra51.

J. Immunol. 2009;182;4158-4166

Gluten Free Society’s Stance:

Gluten is the storage protein found in all grains.  Most research focuses on alpha gliadin as the main culprit in gluten intolerance.  These studies prove that gluten research is still in its infancy and there is a lot more that we do not know about the scope of gluten proteins and the damage they can stimulate.

Additionally, these studies point out more flaws in laboratory testing used to identify gluten sensitivity.  Anti gliadin antibodies are commonly used to measure immune responses to alpha gliadin.  In light of this recent research, one can see the limitations in only measuring reactions to the alpha gliadins, as omega gliadin, C-hordein, and other gluten fractions were found to also to cause immune stimulation.  Additionally, research from the early 50’s (Haas SV and Haas MP: Management of celiac disease, p x. J B Lippincott Company, Philadelphia, 1951.) on 600 celiac patients revealed that using a specific carbohydrate diet (eliminating all grain) led to…

complete recovery with no relapses, no deaths, no crisis, no pulmonary involvement and no stunting of growth.

Because all grains contain gluten (in different forms), and only a fraction of these glutens have been studied, it is foolish to assume that traditional gluten free substitutes are safe for consumption for the gluten sensitive individual.  Consider the following research conclusion:

grain allergens need more study

Also of note is the fact that the origin of the idea that wheat, barley, and rye gluten as the only cause for celiac disease is based on a study performed on only 10 people.  It is time to ask yourself the following question…

Are you on a traditional gluten free diet yet continue to have health problems? A TRUE gluten free diet may be what you need.

Gluten Free Warrior Commentary

comments

13 thoughts on “Patients with Celiac Disease React to Multiple Gluten Proteins

  1. darlene says:

    well this is interesting since I have problems with c orn soy milk..I avoid these to avoid bloating and stomach pains same as wheat..I have been diagnosed 5 yrs ago..this is a journey that never ends..I am frustrated..though I fell healthier I am eating less because there is less to eat…I eat mostly raw diet..which can get boring..

  2. Robena Lasley says:

    I have been on a gluten free diet ( no wheat, rye , barley, ) since 2006. I was diagnosed with double genes for gluten sensitivity, but not celiac disease. My life has been like a roller coaster with many ups and downs, mostly downs. I have recently discovered that I do much better without any grains in my diet. I still eat a small amount of brown rice, but have given up all other grains. That has helped considerably!

  3. Lillea says:

    I definitely seem to do better eating no grains, including corn.

    This caught my attention:

    “the origin of the idea that wheat, barley, and rye gluten as the only cause for celiac disease is based on a study performed on only 10 people”

    What study was that? I was under the impression that more research had been done on this. Interesting.

    • chandra carr
      chandra carr says:

      Lillea,
      Thanks for posting!
      Prior to the study below, many experts agreed that celiac affliction could be caused by several types of grain based carbohydrate foods. This study concluded that gluten was the culprit, and dismissed all other foods.

      Anderson CM, French JM et al: Coeliac disease: gastrointestinal studies and the effect of dietary wheat flour. Lancet 1:836-842, 1952.

      All the best,
      Dr. O

  4. Nan says:

    I appreciate the information in this article and will share it with my doctor who recently said, “You need some grains in your diet,” in response to my having told him I removed all grains.

    After eliminating traditional glutens, I felt much better, but then the skin on my hands became dry, painful and cracked – nothing like the DH. I cut out the remaining grains -rice, GF oats, and corn- and increased healthy fats – the problem slowly resolved.

    Recently I dined at a gluten-free restaurant. The chicken was coated in rice flour and I ate it plus 3 single grains of rice. The next day the skin on my hands once again became dry and cracked – which is painful and makes it hard to bend my fingers.

    I can live without grains.

  5. Iris says:

    Has anyone tested positive for H. Pylori bacteria, I was diagnosised with gluten intolerance and H. Pylori. So I am battling 2 problems, I feel better once I eliminate grains, but it is difficult to try and eliminate gluten products when its hidden in the label of some goods. I try and not eat out and cook at home from scratch, this has helped me improve my health. When I have eaten something with gluten within the next 24 hours a feel like I have the flu or I am slow as a slug, even the H. Pylori bacteria slows me down and its a difficult bug to treat. I am optimistic that I will have control of this problem of mine. It just takes time and trial and error with foods! This website is very informative and I feel that I am not alone in this battle to feel well again!!

    • chandra carr
      chandra carr says:

      Iris,
      H. pylori is common with gluten sensitivity. Gluten suppresses normal acid production by the stomach and increases the risk for H. Pylori. Try high doses of vitamin C (5 grams/day) and taking a Betaine HCl supplement. Use liberal amounts of garlic and oregano in your food preparation. Together these things will help you tackle your infection.

  6. Alisha says:

    After over 3 years of visiting several doctors and being told I have IBS, I did my own research. When I was looking up my symptoms, I found that I matched almost every one for Celiac Disease. From the bloated belly, constipation and skin reactions to sluggish, almost non-existent energy level, a huge light went off as I continued to read. I haven’t been tested yet because I won’t have insurance for a few more months , but I know this is what I have and know I inherited it. (My mother has been having severe side pain for several years and has been told it was her gall bladder and IBS.)

    In February this year, I first stopped breads and the obvious gluten-containing products until I found it was hidden in so much more. Now I don’t any anything with corn either. I’m hoping in the next year or two I won’t have to feel like a detective every time I go shopping and they will have gluten free on the label. Thanks for the continuous updates because knowledge is power in this quickly growing disease.

  7. Angel says:

    I am eating Gluten free due to chronic Lyme disease and it has helped the symptoms. I began eating rice and corn and symptoms returned. I also am good with no grains. But the BREAD, oh how I miss the bread!

  8. deanna says:

    Corn and Rice are definitely big culprits. If I eat a bowl of popcorn in the evening you might as well have given me a sleeping pill for the following day. I am OUT and functionLESS. Rice also affects my brain and makes me tired. Sweet Rice if I eat if for breakfast I have a headache by 11am. I just completed 12 days of a detox diet and am testing oats today. Will eat them three times a day for three days. We’ll see what happens!

  9. Keiko says:

    Thanks for presenting this information. I haven’t read people’s replies, and you may have answered this, but I am interested in the original source of the statement: “Also of note is the fact that the origin of the idea that wheat, barley, and rye gluten as the only cause for celiac disease is based on a study performed on only 10 people.” Can you send me the source please? I heard this comment on a podcast and have quoted with my families and friends when explaining the amazing shift I have seen in my health after I stopped eating all grains and starchy veggies (I am on GAPS/SCD/sometimes Paleo diet) four months ago. I need good research to back me up. Thanks for responding to my question! Keiko

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