November 11, 2011

Using The Right Lab Test To Identify Food Allergies

 

Want to Know How Food Allergy Works?

I recently invited one of the world’s leading experts in food allergy diagnosis to Houston to speak to a group of my patients.  His name?  Dr. Russell Jaffe, M.D.  In the video he discusses how food and environmental allergies work and how to best identify them.

It can be two hours to two weeks from the time you get exposed to a food or chemical until a delayed reaction happens…

He discusses a number of great health topics:

  • Doctors are taught not to think
  • Delayed Food Allergies
  • Food allergy testing
  • Proper immune respones
  • and much, much, more…

To order Dr. Jaffe’s food and chemical lab allergy testing, call 281-240-2229.

Proper Lab Testing is Critical for Implementing the Right Diet

There are a number of laboratories in the U.S. that measure for a variety of different types of food and environmental allergens.  The problem is, many of them yield inconsistent and incomplete results.  I have used numerous of these labs in the past with patients.  One of my qualifiers for a lab is to send out blood samples under two different names to ensure that the lab results are consistent.  In essence, I want to make sure that if a patient needs to restrict their diet that the restriction will have a benefit.

Most Labs Only Measure IgG and IgA

Most allergy testing labs limit what they measure.  They typically only look at one or two types of antibodies (or immunoglobulins).  Unfortunately, humans make five different types of antibodies, but also have other types of chemical reactions to allergens.  The diagram below illustrates the comprehensive delayed allergy response.  When doctors most doctors look for gluten sensitivity, they typically only measure IgG response to the gluten protein gliadin (and gliadin is only one of thousands of different glutens).  It is very well known that this type of testing to identify gluten problems is extremely flawed.

If you have been tested for allergies, and you still aren’t seeing your health improve, you will want to consider a more accurate and more comprehensive test.  If you are looking to accurately find out about gluten sensitivity, you should have the proper genetic testing performed.

All the best,

Dr. O – The Gluten Free Warrior


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7 Responses to “Using The Right Lab Test To Identify Food Allergies”

  • Heidi Cox says:

    I had bloodwork tested through Alcat Labs for food intolerances 2 years ago. Has anyone else used them? How accurate are they?

  • KLozano says:

    I wanted to reply to Heidi’s comment eventhough it has been two years since your initial post. I want to let you know that I had myself tested in 2009 for food sensitivities and found it HIGHLY useful in discovering several foods affecting moods and causing severe sinus problems among other things. I would highly recommend this test to anyone as this definitely narrows things down and gives you a basis for what foods to cut out of your diet for a time and re-introduce them in order to narrow down the problem foods. I have recently had this same test re-taken and am currently waiting for the lab results. I truly hope this helps others that may suspect that they have food intolerance issues.

  • Becky says:

    I have all the symptoms of Celiac with a negative DNA test.
    Does this test rule out Celiac 100%, or do we really know this for sure?
    I have read stories of people blood testing negative for it and after eating great amount of Gluten their fifth test was positive.

    But is the DNA test 100% accurate?

    Anyone?

  • Joseph Putnoki says:

    My brother had a bad reaction eating fish soup in a restaurant. Later it happened again and he got tested with skin pricks and concluded he has allergy to fish. 15 yers later visited me from Hungary to Australia and we often eaten in a Chinese restaurant which served a side bawl of soup. A year later he returned home I noticed at the bottom of this soup bawl when finished were some residues of miniature crabs. Asked the cook if they use any seafood in the soup, he said they do sprinkle in some dried sea-insects I called them.

    My brother did not have a reaction I realized, and told him I don’t think he has allergy to seafood like fish. He would need to take fish oil capsules but scared and refuse as 3 gastroenteorologists advised him against just in case” but did not explain.

    Please enlighten me about good test to find out, also am I right he should have a reaction while here eating the soup? I think the first offending soup was “off”. Up till age 45 he was O.K.

    What’s your comment?

    Be well!

    joseph.

  • Dr:Ahmed says:

    Thank you for your help

  • Becky,
    It depends on DNA test you are referring to. Testing for gluten sensitivity genetically requires the measurement of both HLA-DQ genes (alpha and beta1). It also depends on which patterns from the genes were observed. Most labs only investigate for the presence of DQ2 and DQ8. These genes are considered to be high risk celiac genes. However; one can have celiac without them. There are also non celiac gluten sensitive gene patterns that are typically ignored. If done properly, and analyzed thoroughly, the DNA test is the best way to know. It is 99.9% accurate.
    All the best,
    Dr. O

  • Joseph,
    Using the Origins EAB is the best test for delayed food response. It sounds like your brother was having an acute allergic reaction. This type of testing is different. Skin prick is one way to measure for an acute response. IgE blood testing is another. It is also possible that he got a hold of some bad soup altogether.
    All the best to you and your brother!
    Dr. Osborne

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