March 19, 2012

Tooth Decay and Gluten Sensitivity – Is There a Connection?

 

New Study Finds That Patients with Gluten Sensitivity Have Tooth Enamel Issues

…antibodies against gliadin generated in patients with CD (celiac disease) can react in vitro with a major enamel protein. The involvement of anti-gliadin serum in the pathogenesis of enamel defects in children with untreated CD can be hypothesized on the basis of these novel results.

Research Source:

Eur J Oral Sci. 2012 Apr ;120(2):104-12.

In this research study, it was confirmed that gluten causes the body to produce an immune reaction against one of the main proteins responsible for producing enamel on the teeth.  Lack of enamel leads to a variety of oral health problems including excessive cavities, excessive tooth ware and tear, and eventually the premature destruction or loss of teeth.  It is no mystery that gluten proteins can negatively impact the health of the oral cavity.  Even dentists are starting to take an active role in recognizing this problem.

Oral Diseases Linked to Gluten

There are many disease conditions and symptoms of the mouth that have been tied to gluten sensitivity.

  • Canker sores
  • Geographic tongue (gluten induced damage on the tongue – makes the tongue look similar to a topographical map)
  • Tonsilar stones or exudates (appears as white lumps of puss embedded in the tonsils)
  • Pharyngeal Erythema (chronic severe redness in the back of the throat)
  • Excessive mucus production (leads to chronic throat clearing)
  • Bad breath
  • Cystic Frenula (a small cyst can form on the flap of skin connecting your top lip to your gums)
  • Metallic taste in the mouth
  • Inflammatory gum disease

Food Effects What it Comes in to Contact With

The mouth, tongue, teeth and soft tissues in the intestinal tract are no exception.  Good or bad, food can impact the overall condition of the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine.  Chemically speaking, food can impact the pH (acid/base) balance and alter the quantity of good and bad bacteria.  These bacteria are essential for helping us regulate our immune system, digest our food, and produce vitamins like Biotin and vitamin K.

Why is this important?  The improper pH has been linked to gum disease and tooth decay as well.  Additionally, a pH that is too acidic has been shown to contribute to cancer, heart disease, bone loss, diabetes, and many more chronic degenerative conditions.  Vitamin K is essential for bone density, immune regulation, and blood clotting.  Biotin is essential for the proper growth of hair and skin as well as essential in the proper metabolic breakdown of fat.

Abnormal food reactions can cause inflammatory damage.  To the contrary, healthy food can provide necessary nutrients directly to the gastrointestinal tract.  40% of nutrients for the gut come directly from food, not from the blood supply.  Bottom line:  don’t ignore the power that food has over your oral and gastrointestinal health.

Need help going gluten free?  Check out the Glutenology Health Matrix here <<<==

 

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14 Responses to “Tooth Decay and Gluten Sensitivity – Is There a Connection?”

  • Tabitha Teeter says:

    OT: I don’t know what my baby and I have, but baby #3 was born vaginally with an epidural and all accompanying antibiotics. IAfterward broke out in a huge strawberry rash and month later found out i didn’t have the flu…rather I could no longer eat gluten grains, several nongrains, and later no corn either. My baby doesn’t tolerate gluten or corn. Eliminating all from my diet stopped the blood in her stool and the projectile vomiting.

    Of course OB and nurses had “never seen anything like it.”

  • Tabitha Teeter says:

    Weird. I meant to post on c-section article but post came up here. Anyone know how to move it?

  • Penny Sowle says:

    THANK YOU AGAIN for bringing to light something that has been a research project of mine for sometime. After developing BP at age 14, and having the classic diagnosis of it being caused by a virus, due to a drafty window, then having being told the nerve behind my right ear was bein compressed between 2 bones, my parents authorized surgery to correct it. Instead it made the paralysis permenant in some areas to my face, eyes and forehead. After learning I have Celiac disease I started to wonder if my prior BP was connected to CD. Well like everything else that is going on with my medical issues, I’m told–”it was so long ago, we will never know.”–Thank You Dr Osborne for bringing to light the truth about BP and Celiac–Thank You for giving me the answers I was looking for.

  • Kelli says:

    I was diagnosed with autoimmune RA 2 1/2 yrs ago. I was diagnosed with a gluten intollerance/sensitivity by my rheumatologist. I immediately started eating GF and felt great. In the last year, my lips, chin, tongue have a numb tingling sensation. It’s very annoying. I do not consume gluten. Will this ever stop? I’m in Houston and desperately need to come to your clinic.

  • Kelli,
    Sounds like a neurological issue. Food is very commonly a trigger. Consider coming in to see me or having your other doctor do a more in depth analysis of food allergies, sensitivities, and intolerances.
    All the best,
    Dr. O

  • Laurie says:

    Question – are there any concerns with using magnesium chloride transdermally with hypothyoidism? I ask because I know that chlorine and bromine can potentially interfere with iodine absorption.

  • Avelina Mendes says:

    Thank you for such an interesting article. I have been gluten free since January and I feel that my health has improved greatly. I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism a couple of years ago (there’s an autoimmune element to it), I refused allopathic drugs and being that I am a herbalist, I have been treating myself with herbs and supplementing with selenium and vit. E. My TSH levels normalized within a few months, but occasionally I would get a set back and they would increase. I was also, careful with my diet, I would avoid foods with goitrogens and greens from the cabbage family were properly cooked. After some research I realized that my hypothyroidism was possibly gluten induced and that’s when I decided to cut gluten from my diet. I never thought about taking magnesium. Would Epsom salts (half a teaspoon in juice)be a good alternative to tablets?!

  • Penny Sowle says:

    LGS article–DR O I have read the article on LGS several times and I still do not see where anything is mentioned on how to heal it. Am I missing it?

  • No, I would not recommend taking epsom salt. You would do much better with a magnesium citrate or malate.
    All the best,
    Dr. O

  • Laurie,
    No magnesium will not interfere with iodine uptake the way that chlorine, bromine, and fluoride do.
    All the best,
    Dr. O

  • Penny,
    There is no generic protocol to heal leaky gut. Many people attempt taking digestive enzymes, probiotics, and natural anti-inflammatory preparations, and although these can be helpful, the only way to specifically heal LGS (leaky gut syndrome) is to rule out intestinal infections (and treat if necessary), and to rule out other food and environmental allergens that continue to perpetuate the condition.
    Dr. O

  • Yenni says:

    How do you check for additional allergens/in tolerances the best way? Seems to be so many tests out there and I am not sure what to trust.

  • BB says:

    I have been doing down hill for the past 7 years, The doctors kept giving me antibiotics for ear infections, never did they help. This went on for three years continuously until I finally said no more. Then I began having so many symptoms I can’t even put it into words. I have been blood tested for celiac and that came up negative. My dad died seven years ago advanced ulcerated colitis he basically bled his whole life and was too afraid to go to the doctors.
    My question is how do I know for sure if this is a candida issue because most of it I is digestive problems or am i gluten intolerant. Do You think that metalmatrix GI Effects test would be worth wild?
    I am a nanny with no health insurance and cannot afford to come to your clinic but woulld greatly appreciate any advice.

  • Becky,
    GIFX would definitely be worth your wild.. I would also recommend that you watch the video (link below) to ensure that you are following a TRUE gluten free diet.
    http://www.glutenfreesociety.org/product/7-highly-effective-habits-of-a-gluten-free-warrior/
    All the best,
    Dr. O

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