This topic contains 12 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by Monica Cheng Monica 7 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #7917
    Polina Conrad
    Polina
    Member

    I found this website

     

    http://pantrypup.com/products-page/wild-rice/wild-rice-pasta//

     

    I sent them an email asking if their wild rice pasta is made only with organic wild rice, at least so it seems, I will let you know when they reply.

    I had to digg around the internet for a while to find this, I really miss pasta. Spaghetti squash is good, but it ain't pasta

     

    Polina

    #8929

    I checked out the wild rice pasta ingredients on the website you posted.  The main ingredient is durum semolina, which is a product of wheat.  So, why would a gluten intolerant person eat this?  Hopefully, I am missing something.

    #8931
    Polina Conrad
    Polina
    Member

    You are right, it is not gluten free, this is the reply I got from them

    “Thank you for your interest in our pastas. Our wild rice pastas are
    made a combination of organic durum wheat flour and organic wild rice
    flour. Please note that the wild rice pastas are NOT gluten free
    because of the wheat flour. Our other gourmet pastas are made with
    durum wheat flour and natural herbs and spices. On http://www.pantrypup.com,
    full ingredient lists are printed in the description of each pasta so
    you can quickly see what each pasta is made of. Please contact me if
    you have other questions.”

     

    Too bad,  I was so excited, I don't know if we can ever find pasta made out of wild rice only ?

     

    They do offer wild rice flour, I have never baked with it.

    #8936

    I know what you mean.  Pasta is one of those foods of my past and I have very fond memories of it.  🙂  But really, I don't miss it at all.  There are so many foods that I can eat.  I have learned to absolutelty love spaghetti squash.  And when spaghetti squash is not available at the store, I bake a potato.  Everyone else has spaghetti sauce on pasta, but you should try it on a baked potato.  It is really a good substitue for pasta. 

    #8952

    Thanks, Jean!  I've been craving pizza.  Putting gluten-free toppings and sauce on a potato sounds like a workable substitute!

    #9041
    Theresa Vela
    Theresa
    Member

    Jean Stipelcovich said:

    I checked out the wild rice pasta ingredients on the website you posted.  The main ingredient is durum semolina, which is a product of wheat.  So, why would a gluten intolerant person eat this?  Hopefully, I am missing something.


    Polina said:

    I found this website

     

    http://pantrypup.com/products-page/wild-rice/wild-rice-pasta//

     

    I sent them an email asking if their wild rice pasta is made only with organic wild rice, at least so it seems, I will let you know when they reply.

    I had to digg around the internet for a while to find this, I really miss pasta. Spaghetti squash is good, but it ain't pasta

     

    Polina


     

    #9043
    Theresa Vela
    Theresa
    Member

    I checked out the website too and although the pastas are not gluten free they had some very interesting recipes for wild rice. I'm definitely intrigued with the idea of using wild rice flour.  Acording to the site you can substitute it for rice flour especially brown rice flour. Anybody tried it yet? Wonder if anyone here has made homemade pasta or has a pasta machine? Let's see… wild rice, almond, coconut,&/or bean flours. Might be time for some “experimenting”!  Also found a recipe on epicurious for a lemon cake that uses brown rice flour…if 'tis true that you can substitute wild rice flour for brown rice flour…Oh, and the recipe for Wild Rice Cocunut Milk Pudding on pantry pup  sounds like it may be worth a try too!  As is their recipe for wild rice and beans…..All in all I think Pantrypup will prove to be a very useful site. Thanks Polina!

    #9044
    Lori Quandt
    farmwife67
    Member

    Where can you get wild rice flour?  I would try experimenting with that.  I don't have a pasta machine, but I would buy a cheap one if I could make my own pasta. I too miss pasta tremendously.  I use spaghetti squash too, but like you say it's no pasta!

    Thanks,

    Lori

    #9045
    Theresa Vela
    Theresa
    Member



    Lori, the pantrypup site sells it as do a couple other sites when I did a google search for “wild rice flour”. There is always Amazon too. I have read some blogs that say they use a coffee or grain grinder to grind their own.(Less chance of crosscontamination that way) I'm thinking I may post the question on “Grain Free Mom” on Facebook or even on “Grain Free Living”.  The http://www.pantrypup.com folks are in Canada, hopefully I can find someplace closer to order from!  Did you check the recipes page on there? I'll have to at least start with some of those!

    Theresa

    #9493

    Hi everyone! I have been using “Tinkyada” Pasta Joy Brown Rice Pasta Shells with rice bran. On the bag it states this: wheat free, gluten free  “our entire factory premise and all machines are dedicated to the manufacture of rice pasta – no other grain or cereal to prevent cross grain contamination at production. Kosher certified Kashruth Council of Toronto

    Ingredients: Brown rice, rice bran and water

    the websites listed are
    http://www.ricepasta.com and
    http://www.tinkyada.com
    Phone: 1-888-323-2388
    Being a newbie at all of this, trusting the labels (good grief LOL) this is the info they provide on the packaging. I did not know about all of the “hidden” ways gluten is in our foods untill I watched Dr Osborne's video today! I will call them myself to see if there are any reasons to suspect hidden gluten.

    #9494
    Martha Swift
    Martha
    Participant

    Hi, Raven, welcome to the forum!  Don't bother calling the company.  The problem with the pasta you listed is the brown rice itself.  All rice (except wild rice) is a grain, so by definition it contains a form of gluten.  Traditionally, rice and corn have not been considered “dangerous grains” for various reasons that Dr. Osborne outlines in his videos.  These are mostly historic reasons based on how traditional Celiac's disease was discovered and studied.  Dr. Osborne maintains that you have to remove ALL grains from your diet (including corn and rice) if you want to calm the inflammation and heal yourself.  “Gluten Free” labeling on any commercial product refers only to the traditional grains of wheat, rye, barley, and sometimes oats, so you cannot rely on the labeling alone if you want to avoid all grains. 

    #9509

    You know, for all you pasta lovers out there, you can get KELP NOODLES which are a great substitute and totally gluten free, since they are made from seaweed.   They are flavorless, colorless (see through) and like a gel almost, but they hold up well to sauces.  

    Also, at our house we use kale or collard greens thinly sliced and lightly cooked as “noodles.”   Laugh

    #9579
    Monica Cheng
    Monica
    Member

    Hi everyone, I found a pasta at HEB that is made of tapioca flour. It is in the Asian/International section of the store. I think the brand is “Elephant” something or other and has a picture of an elephant on the packaging. It's not exactly the same as regular pasta, but closer than mung bean noodles (which is also pretty good and in the same section in a hot pink netting packaging). I miss pasta, too! =)

    I had also heard of yam noodles which you can get at an Asian grocery store (99 Ranch on Hwy 6 and Settlers Way). I think this one is in the refrigerated section, but ask around.

    Monica 

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