This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Kate Osborne Peter Osborne 5 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #8462
    Kate Osborne
    Peter Osborne
    Keymaster

    As you should know, corn gluten is detrimental to those with gluten issues.  Below is a link to another research study proving the point.  In this case – corn oil leading to villous atrophy and increased inflammation:

    http://www.glutenfreesociety.org/corn-oil-usage-increases-villous-atrophy/#

    All the best,

    Dr. OSmile

    #10265

    @gluten Free Society said:
    As you should know, corn gluten is detrimental to those with gluten issues.  Below is a link to another research study proving the point.  In this case – corn oil leading to villous atrophy and increased inflammation:

    http://www.glutenfreesociety.org/corn-oil-usage-increases-villous-atrophy/#

    All the best,

    Dr. OSmile

     

    Hi,

    Someone I know has been off of gluten (wheat, barley, etc.) for years and things seem to have gotten a lot better. I am wondering, though, if he has been eating corn-based products, are the standard blood tests for celiac disease helpful in diagnosing problems (from eating corn) or is the problem different and only an endoscopy to view the villi will give an accurate diagnosis?

    Thanks

    #10272
    Kate Osborne
    Peter Osborne
    Keymaster

    Current blood tests do not detect corn based damage.  Biopsy tests are also flawed.  The best test to determine the need to be completely gluten free (including corn, rice, and other gluten containing grains) is genetic testing.  Go here and watch the video: http://www.glutenfreesociety.org/why-does-my-lab-test-for-gluten-come-back-negative/

    All the best,

    Dr. OSmile

    #10273

    Dr. O,

    What is your opinion on the Cyrex Labs Test #4? It would seem that the portion of the test that deals with determining whether or not you are having cross-reactions to corn and other grains wouldn’t be all that accurate, since our problems are with the gluten proteins in the grains. Is this right?

    There’s no test available right now that tests all of the different gluten proteins in grains, right? If there was, I guess we could eat whatever grains had absolutely no effect on us while staying away from wheat gluten and whatever other grains that did cause us problems.

    Thanks,

     

    Jeff

    #10275
    Kate Osborne
    Peter Osborne
    Keymaster

    Jeff,

    There are thousands of different glutens found in all of the varying grains.  No lab definitively investigates these in depth.  Cyrex labs is the most progressive lab to date.  They still only test for IgA and IgG response.  There are four other ways that the immune system can react. 

     

    Because so many of my patients react to grain in general and because glutens share similar structure, and because so many studies investigating other grains come back problematic, my advice is avoidance of grain.

     

    All the best,

    Dr. OSmile

    #10356
    Michaela Rose
    Micki
    Member

    Coming to this a bit late, sorry! We have only just got the Cyrex tests in the UK and I am just looking at them. I agree they are much better than what we have currently, as you say, but still limited to antibody reactions to a few of the peptides etc. What are the four other ways the immune system can react besides antibodies you mention, please, Dr O? I’m not sure what you are referring to there? Thanks – and thank you for saying that about the limitations of the tests – not many have come out and said that!

    #10361
    Kate Osborne
    Peter Osborne
    Keymaster

    Hi Mikki,

    Aside from IgG and IgA reactions, there are IgE (acute), IgM (delayed), Immune complex, and cytotoxic T-cell reactions.

    We are working on trying to make this test available overseas.  Will keep you informed :)

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