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  • #7760
    Kate OsbornePeter Osborne
    Keymaster

    Hello everyone, 

    I just posted a new video on the affects of gluten in children.  Watch part 1 at the following link.  If you have children who were effected by gluten, please share your story…

    /how-gluten-affects-children-part-1/

     

    Thanks,

    Dr. OSmile

    #8541
    Kate OsbornePeter Osborne
    Keymaster

    Here is part two of the video presentation!

    /part-2-how-gluten-affects-children/

     

    Dr. OLaugh

    #8547
    Kate OsbornePeter Osborne
    Keymaster

    Dr. O, I just wanted to tell you thanks so much for posting that video, I thought it was excellent!  I emailed it to over a dozen friends and family whom I suspect to be gluten intolerant, hopefully it will hit home with some/all of them.  The fact that you and your kids are gluten free is so encouraging; we find it hard to find anyone who can relate to our lifestyle. 

    We have all our meals at home, other than packing a lunch if have to we go somewhere (which can be a challenge for two adults and four kids).  The main difficulty is social events such as reunions, holidays, parties etc where food is the center OR overnight trips.  How does your family deal with these situations?  I know in the video you mentioned recognizing the problem as the first step, but then what?  Do you not attend, bring your own food, eat before go whenever possible?  Recently we attended a church function at a waterpark where the kids played for a few hours then when everyone else went to a pizza party we chose just to leave because it was an hour from our home and we needed to think about our next meal, but we felt bad about missing out on the fellowship. 

    What if the event entails everyone sitting around a table eating (such as a dinner party)?  There are so many times I just want to stay home, but don’t want to become a hermit!  The other trouble I have is that being small and skinny and not eating at events, I am worried people will think I have anorexia as it has been mentioned in the past (which I do NOT, I have always been a big eater but reacently have had many foods I’ve had to avoid).  Any suggestions you can give would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks

    #8549
    prairie roseprairie rose
    Member

    mom24es,

    In the past, we have offered to bring something to contribute to the meal, which of

    course was something we were able to eat. The biggest problem we faced with that was

    that the foods we eat are not inexpensive, so to bring enough to feed our family of 4

    and extra to share can become quite costly. We are fortunate to have become friends

    wiith a famliy that is very sensitive to our needs, as they have their own food sensitivities

    but outside of that, I must say, we have found it easier to become hermits. We try to

    seek out events that aren’t centered around food instead. Not an easy task, as our

    culture seems so intent on focusing on food but we have found that when food is out

    of the picture the fellowship is smuch sweeter.

    #8551
    Kate OsbornePeter Osborne
    Keymaster

    Jackie, 

    There is no simple solution to this matter.  Finding a balance for your family is what will work best.  The following video addresses this issue in great detail:

    /video-tutorial/being-gluten-free-and-social-at-the-same-time/

     

    All the best,

    Dr. OSmile

    #8557
    Ariella WellsAriella6
    Member

    both my kids and myself have gluten intolerance.   we still have a very active life.  We just pack food along.  if going somewhere else we bring a dish to share.  It works.  It doesn’t have to be restrictive once you get the hang of it.  We have some friends that are supportive and if we go to their house they try to accomodate us as well.  Classes and outings, i send the kids with food.  So they still have “something” but is not what the other kids are having. 

    I knew my daughter was intolerant from the time she was under a month old.  I could tell by her reactions to milk when she was nursing and that she was getting sick.  my son we didn’t get it figured out until he was 7. 

     

    #8558
    Ariella WellsAriella6
    Member

    i should say also my ex is constantly feeding the kids stuff they can’t have and now my daughter has developed some severe bowel problems in additiont to the stuff she was already dealing with.  does anyone know if there is some research out there that SHOWS the connection between allergies and sensitivities and bowel issues?  Thanks.

    #8561
    Kate OsbornePeter Osborne
    Keymaster

    Ariella,

    I would think there has to be some type of research to support your position with your daughter.  I don’t of anything right off, but depending on the specific type of issues she’s dealing with, you could do a medical search on it.  That is just terrible that her father feeds her what she should not be having!  How old is she now?  I guess the best thing to do is teach HER to tell her Dad she “can’t have that”; maybe she’s not old enough to talk though?  That is a tough situation, I’m sorry she and you are having to deal with that. Frown

    Can you give me an example of what type of dish you “take along” to functions.  I’m having trouble coming up with something that you can prepare ahead of time that is in a single casserole type dish.  We used to always go with gluten free lasagna, but now with being dairy and grain free I need a new idea.

    Jackie

    #8562
    Ariella WellsAriella6
    Member

    i have a FABULOUS lasagna recipe that is totally gluten free and vegan.  I will try to post it on the boards later today.

    My daughter is 4 1/2.  she does know what she can and can’t have.  but sometimes dad gives her the choice of what he has or nothing.  so what do you do? He just keeps making her more and more sick! 🙁

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