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  • in reply to: cashew butter #9704
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    It does clarify, thank you.  So what I'm understanding is that if you're avoiding seeds for a hormone reason then that's one thing, but it's different then saying they aren't safe due to gluten.  Right?  Just making sure I'm getting this straight because I know how confusing this can all be to those who are new to it, and apparently even to those of us who have been at this for years.   

    I must say though, I did think cashews were nuts, I did not realize they were seeds so I apologize for posting that.  My brother in law is allergic to tree nuts and he also avoids/reacts to cashews so I guess he must unknowingly have a problem with seeds or at least cashews in addition to the other tree nuts.

    I haven't had a chance to watch the video you're referring to due to it's length and my computer taking forever to load up videos.  I would love to watch it though and plan to as soon as I have the time to let it load up.  I'm wondering if you use organic raw cashews and soak them if that takes care of the “toxin” problem?  Are you referring to lectins?  Because if so, I think soaking takes care of that. 

    I have just never heard that we should all avoid cashews, but Dr. O if you think that's best for us all can you let us know?  Thanks. 

    Jackie

    in reply to: XYLITOL #9703
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    Judy, I have used honey, agave, and xylitol all interchanged equally.  Stevia and xylitol both can be contaminated with corn but neither have to be avoided as long as you can get them from a good source.  Of course use way much less stevia than the others, I've never converted to stevia as I don't care for the taste of it if used alone.  Xylitol and stevia have a zero glycemic index so they are better for those with candida issues.   From what I understand is that some people have a gut reaction to xylitol due to it being an anti-candida, so you can get a die off reaction.  I would say just start with a small amount and then gradually increase as tolerated.  I'm not sure on your question about what it does to animals and how that compares to us, I would be curious to hear from anyone with knowledge on this. 

    Another option you may look into is coconut palm sugar.  It is also lower on glycemic index (just not zero like xylitol and stevia) and interchanged equally with honey and agave.  All these above mentioned sweetners are natural.  I do not use cane sugar, although it is also natural and safe, it seems to bother me, maybe too high GI?

    Hope this helps and hope your cold is gone! Smile  (I have one too right nowYell)

    in reply to: 22 other food intolerances #9686
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    I hear ya Diane!  When I had my intolerance testing done I didn't even count my other intolerances, it was many many many, I would guess around 40-ish.  Most I had no idea and would never have guessed.  They made up these little cards, like a business card size, with your foods listed, it's meant to be so you can hand it to a waiter at a restaurant or something….anyway, I had so many they wouldn't even all fit on one card.  Mine were broken up into severe, moderate, and mild; then there were my “safe” foods.  My plan said it was ok to still have foods on the mild list, just in very light amounts.  I strictly avoided all my moderate and severe foods for well over six months.  In the mean time I was on (and still am) high dose probiotics, digestive enzymes, and l-glutamine to heal the gut.  I have actually added back a handful just fine, I waited 7-8 months.  There were also a few that I tried to add back but had a definite reaction to.  Honestly you just learn to live with it and after awhile it doesn't seem like a big deal.  I do not buy anything processed either.  Spend lots of time in the kitchen and learn to enjoy it.  I do enjoy food so it makes me happy to try new things and be successful making something that I can have that actually tastes good.  The hardest part for me was the rotation diet, did they recommend that for you?  I was only able to do it for a month or so.  I did end up developing at least one more intolerance (almonds Frown) which I blame on myself for not following the rotation.  I would love to hear from more people who have done or are currently on a rotation.

     

    My thoughts are that after you heal the gut you should eventually be able to tolerate almost anything, just not gluten!

    in reply to: How to cook wild rice #9675
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    I don't measure my liquid I just make sure it's about three inches of water above the rice.  Then I get it boiling, then reduce to a low simmer 45mins to an hour.  I usually end up draining out some water but I prefer to play it safe that way rather than chancing it drying out.  It turns out nice and soft.   

    in reply to: Hello Everyone! #9671
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    First of all welcome to you McDream!  Something in particular you said has crossed my mind more than once:  “Wow, what would life had been like if it had been caught in my early childhood.”  Not to get too much into the emotional/psychological side of all this, but I think it bears mentioning.  I read this somewhere and have come to realize that in order to move forward we have to be especially careful not to dwell in the past.  I doesn't sound like you are, from what you're saying you sound very optimistic and grateful to be where you are now.  For me, I've found these are dangerous thoughts that tend to linger around once they've crept in, it happens occassionally.  I become full of contempt, bitter and angry, which definately does not help the current situation.  It sounds like you are definately on the right track now as I hope we all are.  It certainly can be a long haul, for many of us years into the healing process but like you said, so glad that we all found Dr. O! 

    in reply to: cashew butter #9657
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    Absolutely cashews are completely SAFE for gluten free warriors!  They are neither a seed or a bean, they are a tree nut.  I'm not trying to be rude here, but I would just really hate for someone new to be confused in this way. 

    in reply to: Newbie intro & a symptom question #9646
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    Off subject, but I've now seen mention of the Ultra Biotic product a few times….can you tell me how many billion organisms are contained in it? Could it be used for what I am considering: possibly a lower cost alternative to the Biotic Defense.  We have a family of six and I was thinking would could split up the packets……?  We have been going through the bottles of 30 quite quickly.  Thanks.

    in reply to: Newbie with question #9631
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    Hi Sarah,

    Yes, tapioca and potato starches are both grain free, as is wild rice.  Although, I try to use all three somewhat sparingly. 

    I'm not sure what you can use to sub for the almond flour, maybe others will have some ideas too.  I haven't tried this myself but I've read that you can make your own seed meals using pumpkin or sunflower seeds and substitute those with any nut flour (except coconut).  I can't do almonds, although I can have other nuts so I have been subbing half hazelnut and half chestnut for the almond flour.  I know that doesn't help if your son can't have any tree nuts though.  There are plenty of recipes using coconut flour alone, I highly recommend Spunky Coconut's Grain Free Baked Goods, that is my favorite cookbook by far.  You'd definately find muffins/cookies there.  She uses almond flour occassionally, but not always, and if so it's often in combination with coconut and perhaps tapioca so I'm sure the homeade seed meals would sub just fine. 

    I haven't found any good wrap recipes that meet our criteria, so please share if you find anything. 

    Also I have to point out that giving the kids a homeade grain free treat can definately be done without the processed white sugar, and I also love to bake!  You should look into using small amounts of raw honey or coconut palm sugar.  Sometimes in combination with xylitol and or stevia which are zero sugar, you don't need much.  I agree that the kids deserve the healthiest NO sugar alternative and with a little creativity they won't feel deprived at all.  Once you/they get used to it, you'll never want to go back.  Eating healthy just feels good, especially when you enjoy being in the kitchen which it sounds like you do. 

    Congratulations on your daughter's success so far, keep up the good work! 

     

    in reply to: Tapioca flour – is it true Gluten Free? #9625
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    It is gluten/grain free, although a starch if you're avoiding carbs/sugars may want to limit.  It's derived from cassava root (a tropical plant). 

    in reply to: Multivitamin? #9617
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    This is what Dr. O had recommended to me, the “Perque 2 Life Guard”.  I just order them online, either from DNG vitamins or Pureformulas.  It is gluten and corn free and it's a high quality pharmaceutical grade, which is a more absorbable form than most regular vitamins you just buy at the drug store.  The instructions on the bottle lists out how many you should take according to different factors, but I do just one a day.   

    in reply to: Glutenology #9600
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    I just have to add, I definately agree with the praises for Elana's pantry and her bread being the best!  Another of my very favorite cookbook's is Spunky Coconut's Grain Free cookbook.  Her first cookbook was not totally grain free, but the second is mostly baked goods and is all grain free, dairy free, refined sugar free and several egg free.  She does use beans in some but not all of her recipes though.  This is a great book for those just learning. 

    in reply to: Sauces and dressings #9599
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    For dry white beans I use nutsonline.com  They are certified gluten free, I just soak them overnight or longer then use for cooking.

    in reply to: PYROLURIA #9555
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    Thanks Dr. O.  Can you point me to any books, websites, or good research on how to manage/treat pyroluria?  I'm having trouble finding anything more than general info/brief description on the subject; nothing with a supplement protocol, which is what I'm looking for.  I will search under Dr. Abram Hoffer though, thanks.

    in reply to: Excessive weight loss after going off wheat #9554
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    I had the same type of situation you are describing with weight loss, although I don't consider it “normal”….for me it turned out to be leaky gut with severe malabsorption.  You can order tests for malabsorption yourself through enterolab.  As far as the weight coming back: I lost over twenty pounds, most of that since going grain free.  I have been grain free (also dairy, soy, and refined sugar free) for over a year and a half.  I did not gain any weight after going grain free, but I know it's better for me in the long run.  My doctor ran some tests and I ended up needing digestive enzymes, l-glutamine which is an amino acid to help heal leaky gut, and high dose probiotics.  I also have many other food intolerances which contribute to inflammation and leaky gut.  Since starting all this I've gained about five pounds, which I am delighted for, but I'd still like to gain at least five more to be at a healthy BMI. 

    I would recommend that you find a good functional medicince doctor in your area.

    in reply to: Gluten Free and what to eat! #9543
    Jackie Scarbrough
    Participant

    /forum/all-gluten-free-all-the-time/safe-grains-list/?value=quinoa&type=1&include=1&search=1&ret=all

     

    I found this old post, helpful.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 96 total)