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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 42 total)
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  • in reply to: Pre and post workout carbs #10028
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    I just happened to read in the Harvard Health Letter about a study that found bananas to be “as beneficial as sports drinks for restoring carbs, potassium, and other nutrients expended during exercise.” Other benefits of bananas they noted were antioxidants, a healthier blend of sugars, B6, and fiber.

    in reply to: New member looking for RETAIL grain free bread #9985
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Against The Grain is a company in Vermont. Their products are all grain-free and a couple of them are dairy-free. They make baquettes, rolls, bagels, and pizza which are all fabulous! They are not organic, but it appears from their website that they are the next best thing to organic. Their products are carried in many health-food stores, Whole Foods, etc. Unfortunately, you cannot order their products on-line.

    in reply to: Cross Reactivity to other grains and foods #9932
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Redbird, I rarely comment, but I wanted you to know that I appreciate your thoughtful and informative posts!

    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Regarding the Spectracell, my experience with Dr. Osborne is that he checks it every 6 months in the “healing” phase. He recommends taking supplements for the nutrients you are deficient in and continuing those supplements for 6 months until the next test. If the level returns to normal, then you stop the supplement. Retesting occurs 6 months later to make sure you are absorbing the nutrient from the food you are eating and keeping your levels in the normal range. If not, you go back on the supplement and the cycle starts all over.

    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Diana,
    I’m sorry you don’t have the support of your family as you struggle with the changes in your life—especially when you are still not feeling entirely well. Two weeks is not enough time to feel all the benefits of a grain-free diet. You are probably also deficient in nutrients from poor absorption and have other inflammatory damage that needs to heal. Have you had a Spectracell test for nutritional deficiencies? Are your hormones (including thyroid and adrenal) in normal range? There is just so much more involved than simply cutting out grains (although that is the first and most important step!).
    I share your frustration that the diagnosis of “Gluten Sensitivity” is not a diagnosis that is recognized by the rest of the world and is not a diagnosis that allows you to be “sick.” If you were diagnosed with diabetes or cancer, I’m sure your family members would be falling all over themselves to help you. As it is, the rest of the world expects you to function normally (and blames YOU if your aren’t) even though you are feeling lousy! Education is our only hope in that regard, I’m afraid.
    As to cross-contamination, who does the food shopping and who pays for the food in your household? Would it be possible to put yourself first and take control of your kitchen? Can you stock only food you can eat and let the others buy, store, prepare, and eat gluten-containing food elsewhere (at a neighbor’s or at a church kitchen)? Perhaps you can negotiate with your family to do this for 6 months or a year. If the burden to go elsewhere becomes too great for them, your family members (who share your genes!) may actually start to feel better themselves if they start to eat only the food that your provide! It’s the “put your oxygen mask on first before helping your children” mentality. Do you totally have to sacrifice yourself and your health for the “comfort” of your family members? Do you have spiritual leaders whom your family respects who could intervene on your behalf?
    I sympathize with your frustration both that you aren’t feeling well immediately, and that you don’t have the support of those who are closest to you. I wish you luck on your long journey back to health!
    Martha

    in reply to: New and need help #9820
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    I see website links are no longer posting… The end of my sentence above was a link to Elana’s Pantry. She also has a cookbook called “The Almond Flour Cookbook.” I think she is one of the best sources for people starting out on the grain-free diet. Her recipes are kid-friendly and mimic “regular” food more than any others I’ve seen.

    in reply to: New to the site #9814
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Thychamp, like Jackie, I can’t answer all your questions, but I did want to make a couple of comments as your story is very similar to mine. Fortunately, though, I had resolving asthma symptoms as my “short-term” marker that the grain-free/dairy-free diet was working for me. What did not get better right away, though, were the fatigue and the endocrine issues. In fact, I’m still working on them…. (18 months on the diet). One thing I’ve learned from my research is that you have to treat the adrenals first. Without functioning adrenals, all the other sex hormones down the biochemical pathways are compromised.

    Two interventions in my case have made a huge difference in how I feel. The first was Vitamin A supplementation which helped with the skin issues. The second was high-dose Vitamin C. I have never had a more positive reaction to anything I have tried than I had with Vitamin C. You can find out the dose you need by doing a Vitamin C Flush (http://www.perque.com/test/dev/uploads/How%20To%20Do%20A%20C%20Flush_v2.pdf). I started out needing 25 tsp. of Vitamin C per day, but have now reduced that to 3 tsp. I felt like I was on an adrenaline rush when I took the Vitamin C, and I could judge that I needed to reduce the dose when I started not being able to sleep! Vitamin C and B-5 are two of the vitamins needed for proper adrenal functioning. It may be worth a try for you.

    Btw, you don’t have to fly down to Sugar Land. Dr. Osborne will “see” you by phone.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: New and need help #9813
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Mary,
    There is a section in this Forum for True Gluten Free recipes. You can also find many at http://www.elanaspantry.com.
    Good luck!
    Martha

    in reply to: Carb staple #9724
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    That's a loaded question and a difficult one to answer. It depends on what health goals you are trying to achieve. If I'm reading your question correctly, you are looking for a bread substitute. From a simply grain-free perspective, white potatoes would probably be the answer. Potatoes, however, have a high glycemic index and should be eaten sparingly if at all. Also, from a leaky gut/allergen perspective, nothing should be eaten 3 times per day every day. The best source for carbs is from a wide variety of vegetables.

    I started this diet (and eased my family into it) by baking “carb staples” with almond flour and coconut flour (breads, muffins, cookies, crackers, etc.). I still bake, but less so now as we've adjusted to the “healthier” concepts we've been learning about (it's a process!). Crackers continue to be one “staple” that I continue to make regularly as they satisfy that snacking need and keep us out of the chip bag!

    in reply to: Carb staple #9723
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    That's a loaded question and a difficult one to answer.  It depends on what health goals you are trying to achieve.  If I'm reading your question correctly, you are looking for a bread substitute.  From a simply grain-free perspective, white potatoes would probably be the answer.  Potatoes, however, have a high glycemic index and should be eaten sparingly if at all.  Also, from a leaky gut/allergen perspective, nothing should be eaten 3 times per day every day.  The best source for carbs is from a wide variety of vegetables. 

    I started this diet (and eased my family into it) by baking “carb staples” with almond flour and coconut flour (breads, muffins, cookies, crackers, etc.).  I still bake, but less so now as we've adjusted to the “healthier” concepts we've been learning about (it's a process!).  Crackers continue to be one “staple” that I continue to make regularly as they satisfy that snacking need and keep us out of the chip bag!

    in reply to: Rainbow Stew #9610
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Sometimes they have organic, sometimes not.  Perhaps if enough of us ask, they'll start stocking pre-cut organic veggies also!

    in reply to: Rainbow Stew #9608
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    At our Whole Foods in Sugar Land, TX, the pre-cut veggies are in a special section in the produce department.  I've never had to ask!

    in reply to: Glutenology #9604
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Heidi,

    I posted one of my favorite stews–Rainbow Stew from “The Grain-Free Gourmet” in the recipe section since you are looking for stew recipes.  I also just bought “Paleo Comfort Foods – Homestyle Cooking for a Gluten-Free Kitchen” by Julie and Charles Mayfield.  The recipes look good.  I'll have to see if they taste good, too!

    Martha

    in reply to: Worcdestershire Sauce Gluten Free #9603
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    You could try using mustard.  I've substitued mustard for soy in a couple of recipes with good results.  I've no idea if it would work here, but might be worth a try.

    in reply to: Glutenology #9595
    Martha SwiftMartha
    Participant

    Heidi,

    I agree that a supplement to the cookbook would be useful–one that lists the brands of “packaged goods” that are safe or includes recipes for things you need to make yourself.  I have found many recipes in the cookbook that I like and make frequently, but I shy away from those that use the products you listed.  For the reasons you stated, I would not recommend the cookbook to someone just starting out on the diet.  “The Gluten-Free Almond Flour Cookbook” by Elana Amsterdam and “Grain-Free Gourmet” by Jodi Bager and Jenny Lass would be better as beginning books.

    I'll post the recipe I use for Worcestershire Sauce in the “recipes” section of this website.  I found it on epicurious.com. 

    Wild rice is okay to use.  It is a grass, not a grain.  Any other form of rice, though, is taboo.  I've used packaged chicken broth for the wild rice recipe (Pacific Organic Free Range Chicken Broth), but it's a gamble as I haven't researched the source of the “organic chicken flavor” listed in the ingredients….  Probably better to make your own or use water.

    I don't recall a reference to arrowroot in the videos, but it's been awhile since I saw them, so I would be interested in the answer to that question also.

    Happy cooking!

    Martha

     

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 42 total)