#10138
Kate Osborne
Peter Osborne
Keymaster

Your welcome Micki.  Here you go:

 

“Common dietary staples such as cereal grains and legumes contain glycoproteins called lectins which have potent antinutritional properties (Table 1) which influence the structure and function of both enterocytes and lymphocytes (Liener, 1986; Pusztai, 1993). Wheat-germ agglutinin derived from dietary wheat products is heat stable and resistant to digestive proteolytic breakdown in both rats (Pusztai et al. 1993a) and human subjects (Brady et al. 1978) and has been recovered intact and biologically active in human faeces (Brady et al. 1978). Wheat-germ agglutinin and lectins in general bind surface glycans on gut brush-border epithelial cells causing damage to the base of the villi which includes disarrangement of the cytoskeleton, increased endocytosis and shortening of the microvilli (Liener, 1986; Sjolander et al. 1986; Pusztai, 1993). The structural changes induced by wheat-germ agglutinin on intestinal epithelial cells elicit functional changes including increased permeability (Sjolander et al. 1984) which may facilitate the passage of undegraded dietary antigens into systemic circulation (Pusztai, 1993).” “Legume and cereal lectins alter the microflora of the gut (Liener, 1986; Banwell et al. 1988; Pusztai et al. 1993b), causing both inflammation (Wilson et al. 1980; Liener, 1986; Pusztai et al. 1993b) and increased intestinal permeability (Greer et al. 1985)” “Maize, like wheat, can alter intestinal epithelial structure and function (Mehta et al. 1972). The biological activities of cereal lectins are similar because they are closely related to one another both structurally and immunologically (Peumans & Cammue, 1986).”

 

“Maize, like wheat, can alter intestinal epithelial structure and function (Mehta et al. 1972). The biological activities of cereal lectins are similar because they are closely related to one another both structurally and immunologically (Peumans & Cammue, 1986).”