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Prolamine (gluten protein)
October 20, 2010
11:41 pm
michellebelle

Gluten Free Veteran
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
October 20, 2010
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Hi Dr. Osborne, I have an important question that I am REALLY confused about. I was researching the gluten protein, prolamine. I know there are pseudocereals (quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth) that are a seed and not a grain and do not contain gluten. But they would naturally have protein. So, are gluten proteins and regular protein different? This link states the amount of protein-protein in GF grains (even though they are not all "true" GF).

http://glutenfreecooking.about…..grains.htm

And this link is a book about cereal (I was specifically looking up teff-millet). It shows a graph of the protein-prolamine (if you scroll down just a tiny bit) of the different types of millets.

http://books.google.com/books?…..mp;f=false

Is there a difference between regular protein and prolamine? Does teff contain gluten?
Below is a chart of grains and the amount of prolamine they contain:

Grain – Prolamine – %
Wheat – Gliadin – 69%
Rye – Secalinin – 30-50%
Oats – Avenin – 16%
Barley – Hordein – 46-52%
Millet – Panicin – 40%
Corn – Zien – 55%
Rice – Orzenin – 5%
Sorghum – Kafirin – 52%

 

Thanks, Michelle

PS- I'm back! I finally was able to figure out how to log back in! It says I'm a new member but I actually have quite a few posts on here from before that are now marked as a guest comment.

 
October 25, 2010
7:52 pm
Gluten Free Society
Admin
Forum Posts: 596
Member Since:
January 4, 2010
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Welcome Back! 

Great question.  Gluten proteins tend to have a structure that is

  1. difficult to digest
  2. recognized by our bodies as an antigen (invader)

Not all proteins share this similarity with gluten.  Prolamines in particular are difficult to digest and were originally identified as being soluble in alcohol.  Recent study has shown that the glutelin fraction of gluten proteins causes reactions in many with gluten intolerance.

The science on all of this is still in its infancy.  So we are learning more and more with new research.

Teff does have gluten.  I do not recommend it.

All the best,

Dr. O

 
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